Recent mentions in Dusted!

My recent tape Beginners and digital collection of live recordings both get some words out of Bill Meyer at Dusted:

Billy Gomberg is no beginner. He’s been releasing music of his own and with Fraufraulein, a duo with Anne Guthrie, for nearly a decade. And the sound sources he uses on this tape are familiar ones — electric bass, urban field recordings, synthesizer and hand-manipulated objects. Even so, it feels like something new is happening here. Gomberg’s music has often seemed to stretch away from the listener, luring you to follow it through virtual expanses of space and time. Now it seems closer at hand, the sounds like sunning fish just under a pond’s surface. They’re simultaneously more recognizable and more processed that what he’s played in the past, creating a discreet reality that never quite loses its mystery no matter how often you play it.  (link)

In his summary of his Voting Rights Day shopping on Bandcamp, Bill found my bundle of live sets to defy his “not quite a physical object” rule:

Well, there go the rules. This DL-only compilation of concert performances by one of my favorite ambient recording artists of recent years shows that the carefully wrought, ultra-deep atmosphere of his recent cassettes is no fluke. (link)

 

Beginners in Tabs Out

Tabs Out covers Beginners and the rest of this batch of tapes out now from Dinzu Artefacts:

Gray Lee writes about Beginners:

A sonic playground of organic tactile sensations. Eerie air moves through hollow tunnels filled with unusual fragments of forgotten lives. Quiet inspections of abandoned possessions take place in shadowed dusty alcoves. Unseen breezes sway aluminum sculptures in filtered sunlight. Is this recording for beginners, who are just starting to explore a hidden world? Explore that world yourself, and you may begin to know.

Fluid Radio explores heavy objects

Nathan Thomas explores ideas of space and environment on Heavy Objects and Giovanni Lami’s Hysteresis work:

“Lami and fraufraulein approach the problem of how to respond musically to environmental sounds in very different ways, but the results are equally intriguing. The differences are pointed to by the titles they use: ‘Hysteresis’, a word denoting a system that incorporates some lag, delay, or history dependence, refers to process; ‘when we evaporate’ names the intention to actually evaporate into the environment, including a time and a voice to place the emphasis on affect. Translating into the language of the visual arts, you could call Lami’s technique a sort of live, instantaneous cut-up or collage, while fraufraulein mobilise the desire, often expressed in the annals of art history, to step through the canvas and into the painting.”

full writeup below:

Giovanni Lami / fraufraulein

 

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