Brian Olewnick on Heavy Objects

A rare missive from Brian Olewnick’s woodsy retreat:

How nice to have some new Fraufraulein! Anne Guthrie (French horn, objects) and Billy Gomberg (electronics, bass guitar) have a special way of creating all-but-casual soundscapes from found materials and horn snippets, often subtly underlined by Gomberg’s essentially melodic take on things. There’s a relaxed feeling, walking speed, but extremely observant, choosing sounds with a balance of care and nonchalance. There’s a sense of a pure field recording that happens to contain musical elements as part of the environment, as when the (I think) small horn burps bubble to the surface about 12 minutes into ‘One of Us Always Tells the Truth’; very engaging. Firecrackers in the street begin side two, ‘When We Evaporate’, sharing space with muffled bass plucks and soft, wistful horn lines, all soon blending with the general, urban ambience outside the window. More small explosions, as though recorded on July 4th or Chinese New Year, airplanes passing, distant radio. Toward the end, the bass becomes a bit more insistent, even establishing a rhythm, Guthrie’s horn wafting atop, a very fine coalescing of all that’s transpired before. Excellent work all around, a real treasure. More, please.

Transition in The Quietus

Good company in Tristan Bath’s Spool’s Out column at The Quietus:

In comparison, Brooklynite sound artist Billy Gomberg’s offering on Transition is a relatively peaceful affair. Deeper listening reveals layers of hidden meaning, and in my own case, no small amount of terror. This is incredibly abstract music though, and one wonders how much the translucent, vaporous meaning is in the ear of the beholder. The single piece on side A seems at first to blend together various field recordings to create a strange new, third location. Distant industrial clatter or public transport noises soon turn out to be Gomberg’s own tones summoned from goodness knows where, and the collage then segues from place to place as it travels onwards. The two shorter pieces on side B are no less mysterious. Whether the overall effect is peaceful of terrifying is perhaps up to you to decide – either way it’s an absorbing trip to take.

http://thequietus.com/articles/22079-dale-cornish-dinzu-artefacts-yearning-kru-eiderdown-records-me-claudius-cassette-tape-review