Students of Decay on Boiler Room

this mix of fresh gems from Students of Decay features a track off my upcoming LP, Slight At That Contact:

SOD on Boiler Room

Intro from Alex Cobb:

This mix of 100% unreleased material is a snapshot of some of the records slated for production on Students of Decay in the coming year, with the exception of the opening track which appears on our next release, hitting shelves in December.

Followers of the label will recognize many familiar names here, which is in line with my tradition of keeping things close to the vest.

Running a label in 2015 is often a thankless and uncertain job, but I found myself inspired and reinvigorated while putting together this mix. I hope it treats your ears just as warmly.

Intro from Boiler Room:

Students of Decay has been in operation for a full decade now, and there’s a solid chance you’re unaware. Even closing in on 100 releases, the label’s stable contains names unfamiliar to most heads, let alone the layman. Last year Kyle Bobby Dunn’s 2hr opus …& the Infinite Sadness (shouts to all the zeroes out there) probably made the single biggest ‘splash’, but it’s all relative.

As opposed to a label like, say Editions Mego, there’s been no accidental stumbling onto the zeitgeist along the journey – and if anything, Decay is all the richer for it. Around a teaching career and family life in first California, then Ohio, Cobb has been diligently putting out whatever he finds especial resonance with; field recordings, acoustic noodling, thick drone, all sorts. There’s no attempt to sprint toward any ambient goldrush or change policy to make good on trends. It’s a labour of love.

And so it proves here: a clutch of 2016 material that is subtle, graceful and surprisingly stirring. It’s half the length of Air Texture’s equally beautiful Upfront entry from late Fall last year – entirely purposeful, as Cobb feels these “tend to fare better erring on the side of concision, or at least thats generally my governing principle when I make them” – and so demands to be replayed and reinvestigated as soon as it draws to a close. Not something that can be said about all ambient mixes.

To me, by turns it evokes Fax +49-69/450464, The Sinking Of The Titanic and even Sigur Ros’ bowed swells on M. Sage’s closer. But it’ll probably sound different to your ears. And that’s the beauty of the thing.

Fraufraulein: Listed (Dusted Magazine)

Anne & I were asked by our friends at Dusted to contribute to their Listed series…

check it out at Dusted!

Jason Bivins on “Extinguishment” at Point Of Departure

“On each of these pieces, the mechanical and the environmental blend together provocatively, giving a clear (but ever changing) sense of dimension and palpability to this music.”

(entire writeup pasted below)

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Bill Meyer/Dusted on “Extinguishment”

Bill Meyer writes on “Extinguishment” via Dusted:

“…their collaboration confounds the rules of addition so that more seems like less. Even when they’re the only ones making sounds on Extinguishment, they seem to be small parts of something larger.”

complete review below:

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Another Timbre at Music & Literature

lovely article from Paul Kilbey at Music & Literature listening through the recent releases from Another Timbre, including “Extinguishment”:

“Three hypnotic pieces of between 11 and 16 minutes combine improvisations on bass guitar (Billy Gomberg) and French horn (Anne Guthrie) with electronics, recordings from their live shows, and field recordings. These are blended with great subtlety—it’s barely ever clear where one element ends and another begins—and they add up to something gently mesmerizing, a soft wash of sound often reminiscent of what you might hear walking idly about in a quiet town. Two-thirds of the way into the first track, “convention of moss,” some sort of choral folk-music concert gradually comes into focus and then fades away amid the sound of heavy rain. Soft bleeps and the murmur of a crowd of people vaguely suggest a shopping center—to me, anyway. It is a tapestry, within which one element is the listener, eagerly finding imagined patterns, overinterpreting, even..”

and in general about this group of records, Kilbey writes:
“…the thing is, there are such large spaces left between the notes on all these albums that really, they are as good as the number of thoughts they set off in the listener’s mind.”